Friday, December 31, 2010

Favorite Crocheted Hot Pads



I picked up this free pattern in a favorite craft store. The pattern was called “Grandma Leona’s Hot Pad” and the sample was fabulous. It was nice and thick. It looked simple. However, the directions were really poor. It was as if Grandma Leona dictated them from memory, over the phone, when she was half asleep! Because that sample looked so good, I tried to figure out the directions and gave up a number of times. But I persisted long enough to finally figure out what Grandma Leona meant, and this hot pad really is as great as something from a grandma ought to be.

Here are better directions, I hope! I think you’ll probably see why it was hard to figure out. It doesn’t sound easy, but the pictures ought to help.

Materials: 2 balls, worsted weight, cotton yarn. (each ball makes 1 hot pad) Size G crochet hook.


Gauge: 4 sc = 1"; 6 rows = 1" (When I use a G hook with 26 chain foundation, the hot pad usually measures about 6 3/4 inches. If you like your hot pads bigger, use 28 or 30 chains in the foundation. Then you would be counting 27 or 29 sc stitches in each row)

Foundation: Chain 26.


Row 1: Sc in the second chain from the hook, then sc in each chain across. (25 sc) Chain 1 and turn.

Row 2: Pick up the back loop of the first sc and the bottom loop of the foundation chain opposite, at the same time. Yarn over and pull through the two stitches on the hook, then another yarn over and pull through the two loops remaining on the hook. This makes the first sc of row 1.

Continue to work in both the back loops of the previous row and in the bottom loops on the opposite side. Sc in each st across. (25 sc.)

The last stitch is critical. In the picture, you can see the turning chain from row 1 at the very end of the row. Count to make sure you have 25 sc.

Again, chain 1 and turn.


Row 3 and continue: Working in the back lps of the stitches in the last row and in the front lps of the stitches of the row before the last row, at the same time, continue to sc in each st across, chain 1 and turn. Continue working the rows in this way until the hot pad measures square.

As you add rows, you will see that the bottom is rounded and that you are making the hot pad double. Each row lays halfway across the previous row. This makes the hot pad nice and thick. Once you get the hang of picking up both stitches, it is as simple and relaxing as most single crochet is.

As I mentioned, you need to be careful to pick up the last stitch in each row. It is small and tight and sometimes difficult to see. If you look carefully at the picture, you can see  the last two threads that I need to pick up to make the last stitch. Sometimes, I have to pull the turning stitch of the previous row aside to see where to put the last stitch.


The picture above shows the last stitch on the hook. If the hot pad is not squaring up, it could be that you are not catching that last stitch. Count the sc in each row and you should be okay.

Measure the hot pad as it progresses. When the hot pad is within one row of being square, work the final row.

Final row: Work in both loops of the sc stitch in the previous row as well as the front loop of the sc stitch opposite on the row before the last one, all at the same time. (3 loops and 1 loop on the hook.) Yarn over and pull through the three stitches, then yarn over and pull through the remaining two loops. This makes the sc. Sc in this manner all the way across and complete the last stitch. Do not make a turning chain. If you don’t want a hanging loop, fasten off the yarn and weave in the tail.

Make a hanging loop: Do not fasten off. Directly from the last stitch, chain 12. Work a sc in the last sc in the last row. Chain 1, then slip stitch in each chain of the hanging loop. End with a slip stitch in the last sc you made. Leave about 6 inches for sewing and cut the yarn.  Use a yarn needle to sew the yarn end through the bottom of the hanging loop a couple of times to stabilize it and then weave in the remaining yarn.

33 comments:

  1. Those are the EXACT hot pads that I learned to crochet! I never had a pattern, either. My mom's friend taught my how to do it when I was 17 or 18 years old. They are my favorite gifts to give to newlyweds. I have NEVER been burned through one. I don't even use store bought ones anymore:) The last time I made some I made a longer rectangular shaped one to use under hot cookie sheets and 9x13 casserole dishes. I love 'em! I don't have to use 2 hot pads under those pans anymore. I just roll 'em up & put them away with the square hot pads. I also like to do stripes with this pattern:)

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  2. Now that's what I call a tutorial. Clear directions and clear pictures. Bless you.

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  3. These are so lovely! Thank you for the detailed instructions. :)

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  4. Thanks for the wonderful instructions - I have been trying to figure out this pattern for a long time, and just couldn't do it! So happy to finally find it - my grandmother and aunt made these all the time...from little coasters to huge hot pads... my hand is cramping from trying to catch the right loop - but I'm sure I'll get the hang of it eventually. Your photos are so helpful!

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  5. Deb, I'm so glad to be able to connect you to this pattern. It really is my favorite hot pad, and it sounds like your family agrees. ;o)

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  6. Thank you so much for the instructions and beautiful pictures for this great pot holder. I received several of these hotpads from my husband's grandmother 46 years ago. I have been trying to figure out the pattern for years as they were wearing out. I had asked all of the aunts and no one could remember how their mother did the pattern. That is all she could crochet when her eyes were failing. She found the loops by touch, I guess, every stitch perfect. Now I can finally make some for my daughters.

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  7. Isn't it wonderful how this pattern connects to people. I'm really so glad!

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  8. Your photo instructions are terrific. While I've made double sided pot holders using two squares, joined, this is a superior technique. As hard as one tries, there always seem to be slight size or shape variations in squares which are not noticeable in an afghan of many pieces joined together, but obvious [to my eye, at least] in small objects on top of one another. Thank you !!!

    Mimi

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  9. I tried this last night and your instructions were wonderful. Thank you so much for sharing this! I've posted it about it on my blog today just to share with everyone I know. Thanks!

    Deedra @ Favorite Little Princess

    http://favoritelittleprincess.blogspot.com/2012/06/crocheted-hot-pad.html

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  10. This is a great tutorial for this technique! I found you via Pinterest, and included a link to this page on my blog this morning. :) http://bit.ly/N9O88u

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  11. I love the look of this and plan to try this very soon. I have pre read your instructions and they seem easy enough to follow. Thanks for sharing photos as it always helps. Great tutorial.

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  12. Great tutorial and a very nice project that I hope to try real soon.

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  13. Hey hun,

    Just wanted to let you know that I featured this on my blog this morning. I would love it if you could check it out and grab my button :)

    http://mammymade.blogspot.com/2012/08/mint-stuff-ive-seen-21.html

    - Adele @ Mammy Made

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  14. Thanks for sharing this great pattern! I've already started making one and your instructions make it a breeze!

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  15. Kathleen,
    Just finished my first "Grandma Leona's hot pad". What a wonderful pattern! Thanks for great instructions & pics.

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  16. Thank you, thank you, thank you! I used to make these and loved them, and then I forgot how to do it, and couldn't find a pattern anywhere! Thank you! I'm making one right now to give as a hostess gift tomorrow.

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  17. Thank you so much for a wonderful hot pad pattern. I just love the finished project. Would like to add your pattern to My Favorites on my blog stitch4ever.com. I want to insure that these beautiful artistic techniques are passed on to our "little" ones!!

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  18. Great technique, a lot faster than making two sides. The picture tutorial is great, also. This is my favorite way to demonstrate a pattern.

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  19. Thank you so much!!! I am a just learning to crochet. This was my first "real" project! Your tutorial was so good, I was able to create a finished hot pad. It is not perfect, but I am very pleased with my first project.

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  20. I am going to go try it .much easier and faster than making 2 parts and sewing or crocheting together. thank you so much for the free pattern for this hotpad, Kathleen. always lovethem when they are free and thank you for explaining it so well. that is not always the case even when you purchase a pattern. thank you so much again and have na happy New Year All ruth

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  21. I love this! It's stitches up so thick and even, the results are beautiful. Much preferable to either stitching two pieces together or working with two strands. I used Peaches and Cream cotton yarn in the yellow and white ombre. Hanging on some bright hooks, they double as homey kitchen decor!

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  22. I found a hot pad in this fashion that my Mom had started before she died, it was half finished, still had her hook in the middle of the row through 2 stitches. Finishing it was easy, figuring out how to start a new one was difficult, because the first couple of rows always looked so wrong. I stuck with it and then made dozens of these things to give away as gifts, they were my go-to gifts for years along with a couple of matching washcloths. Awesome tutorial, thanks for posting.

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  23. Thank you! I made two for my kitchen, and I loved them! Thanks for sharing, and for a well written, easy to follow step-by-step tutorial.

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  24. Someone made these for me as a wedding gift. I have been looking for the pattern since and am so happy to have found this post! The pictures are so helpful by the way :)
    Little-miss-stitcher.blogspot.com

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  25. If not for your wonderful tutorial, I would have never been able to do this pattern. Somewhere along an end, I realized I am very grateful to you!

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  26. Great tutorial. I've completed one and started another. Blogged about it and linked back to you. www.fourmilesnorthofnowhere.blogspot.com

    another Kathleen

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  27. awesome tutorial! they make really great hotpads. NO BURN THROUGH!

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  28. Nice blog,great tutorial and an awesome technique.....thanks for sharing.
    Happy Sunday!

    Luna
    MY Crochet,Mis Tejidos by Luna
    www.alunamistejidos.com

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  29. What a beautiful tutorial. May I cross post? Incidentally, this stitch is known as a "Thermal Crochet Stitch" and I've been seeing it pop up a lot recently. It was just featured In Crochet Today!, January 2014 "Let It Snow" edition, on page 45 (I believe). They used it to make a hanging wall organizer. It appears to be excellent for things which require extra bulk or stiffness, since, like a Tapestry Crochet stitch, you wind up with a doubled-weight fabric. I wish I'd spotted your tutorial weeks ago while I was trying to learn it. Learning this stitch from a written pattern was not easy!

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  30. Just found this via pinterest... Very clear instruction!! I absolutely love that you deciphered it for us thank you!! They're so awesome I've been making them since I found you.. I can't stop!!

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  31. Thank you for the clear instructions! Such an interesting stitch. I couldn't help but try, and your instructions work for double crochet as well. Makes for a slightly less dense, but still sturdy fabric. I wonder how treble crochet would work out? Or half double? or... :D

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  32. I really loved your pattern - I did my pot holder in Chunky yarn and it worked out really well. I've linked your pattern to my blog (www.crafthippy.com) - I hope you don't mind. Jane x

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  33. Hi! Saw other tutorials on this stitch, but liked yours the best. Soooo I linked to this page in both my blog and a pattern I designed. If that's not okay let me know! I absolutely fell in love with this stitch and will also be making the pot holder!!!!! Here's the direct link to the blog post: http://txmommylady.blogspot.com/2014/03/door-guardian.html

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